<![CDATA[CRUIZN the U.S.A. - Daily Posts 2013]]>Sat, 06 May 2017 20:49:56 -0700Weebly<![CDATA[Sunday October 6, 2013]]>Tue, 08 Oct 2013 01:54:07 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/sunday-october-6-2013CRUIZN back home from Provincetown
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It all starts with sunrise over Route 6A outside the Harbor Hotel around 6:47 am and every morning the sky and colors are different.
We were told every morning the sunrise outside our Harbor Hotel is as different and beautiful as anywhere on Cape Cod and rather than fill this page with a sequence of changing colors as the sun rises from the east over North Truro I'll just pick ones that include the Route 6A sign on the road's edge to the left. Click on the picture to enlarge it. If only the Route 6 Tourist Association could convince the Provincetown Chamber to post Historic Route 6 signs properly on the historic alignment instead of the newer highway Route 6. But I suppose that is where most all the tourist traffic travels. 
During a great all-you-can- eat breakfast buffet at the Hot L Grill the rain started and everyone's plans changed. An Elvis retrospective video was playing in the Hotel lounge for those that wanted to wait out the rain showers but I wanted to chance catching some breaks in the weather to take some more pictures of picturesque scenes and historic landmark building that I saw CRUIZN Route 6A on Saturday while Jim and I make our way back home to Attleboro. Unfortunately the only break in rain we caught was the stretch of Route 6A in Yarmouthport, but that means we'll have more opportunities to do it again next October 5 & 6.
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Not only does the Old Yarmouth Inn lay claim to being the oldest on the Cape, founded in 1696 as a stage stop halfway between Plymouth and Provincetown, it keeps winning Best of awards every year for fine dining, brunch, wait staff and ghosts.
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Hallet's Store in Yarmouthport , built in 1889, is worth the stop just to try their famous home-made ice cream sodas by current owner and family descendent Charlie Clark. And while there buy his book "The Hallet Family of Cape Cod" which features photos reproduced from his grandfather's collection of glass-plate negatives. If you've got more time to spend ask if you can go upstairs to visit the Hallet Museum. You won't regret making this stopover.
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<![CDATA[October 5 Seekonk to Provincetown CRUIZE]]>Mon, 07 Oct 2013 17:35:02 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/october-5-seekonk-to-provincetown-cruize2nd Annual Provincetown Weekend Cruise
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This was the rear guard at the Cape Cod Visitor Center for the 200 cars that joined us cruising down Route 6 to Provincetown on Saturday. Long distance couple Roger & Eileen StAmand from Richmond Maine under the HISTORIC ROUTE 6 sign and U.S. Route 6 Tourist Assoc. Director Don Doucette & wife Nancy standing next to the StAmand's truck posed with me sitting on Diamond Lil's fender with my son Jim to my right and Rally Point host D.J. John Remedis & his wife Linda and the oldest cruiser of them all 97 year old Eddie Beaulieu to my left who never misses an opportunity to go CRUIZN, rain or shine.
The second annual U.S. Route 6 Cruise from Providence to Provincetown got off to a questionable start with the weather, but rain never stops this group of determined Route 6 cruisers. Our Seekonk Sam's Club Rally Point saw 14 cars leave on Route 6, adding another half dozen or more at the Al Mac's Diner in Fall River. We lost count at the Emma Jean's Rally Point in Fairhaven because our caravan was stopped at the Pope Island swing bridge in New Bedford for more than a half hour for boat traffic. Not a problem because most of New Bedford's fishing fleet was in harbor giving us unprecedented photo opportunities. We still were able to enjoy the awesome fresh hand dipped apple cider donuts and coffee at Emma Jean's.   Sally Bean reported that about 200 cars passed through the Factory Five Rally point in Wareham before we arrived and Linda Pegnato, President of the Cape Cod Chapter of the National Railroad Historical Society at the West Barnstable R.R. Station said their parking lot was filled with cars on the cruise. Our destination savior for the Provincetown destination activities, Patti Lloyd at the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center Rally Point in Centerville reported much lower number of cars passing through there this year and we later learned that there was a mix up with some cruisers thinking it was John Remedis stuck in New Bedford at the Pope Island bridge crossing, not me, so they didn't bother to stop there.  
The weather turned perfect at the destination host Harbor Hotel on Historic Route 6 and Cape Cod Bay in Provincetown. D. J. Bob Bramwell was busy orchestrating music, signing cruise certificates and passing out dash plaques provided by Factory Five at his camper parked in the back lot.  CRUIZE in, get your dash plaque, buy a "Cruisin' Down Route 6" tee shirt and continue down Commercial Street into the heart of the town at McMillan Pier. The purist in me continued to the end of Route 6, completing my CRUIZE from Long Beach, CA then to Herring Cove Beach to join others waiting for the sunset. Afterwards it was off to the sock hop being run at the Hot L Bar & Grill lounge a block down 6A by our cruisin' D.J. Vic Barboza and the wine and cheese tasting around fire ring at the Harbor Hotel. This was a perfect ending to my CRUIZE across the U.S.A. that began in Boston on August 17.   
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McMillan Pier in Provincetown is the central congregating area for all the tourists and parking can be a problem unless, of course, you have a great looking classic car.
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Sunset at herring Cove is another popular spot near historic U.S. Route 6. That's fellow Mass Cruisers John & Nancy Bloom in the '56 T-Bird, not Woody Allen & Diane Keaton.
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The fire pit outside the host Harbor Hotel was a fitting end to a great Provincetown cruise weekend with my fellow Mass Cruisers Auto Club members.
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<![CDATA[October 4, 2013 UPDATE]]>Fri, 04 Oct 2013 11:44:57 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/october-4-2013-updateReady to finish my U.S. Route 6 CRUIZE Picture
I've taken a 10 day leave of absence from completing the last leg of my coast-to-coast U.S. Route 6 CRUIZE.
Don Doucette, "Wellfleet" and I motored over to Capron Park in Attleboro on September 26 with Sun Reporter Rick Foster and Photographer Mark Stockwell to take some pictures for an article that Rick is writing about my CRUIZN across the U.S.A. adventure.  It was expected to be published that weekend in plenty of time ahead of the October 5 & 6 Provincetown cruise but. other news and events means it won't appear until sometime after I officially complete this 9,000 mile CRUIZE across America. 
Following the photo shoot with Rick and Mark, Don and I then motored over to the Seekonk, MA Rally Point at the Sam's Club parking lot fronting U.S. Route 6, with "Wellfleet" and "Diamond Lil", my trusty but tranny oil leaking 1931 Dodge street rod. My '31 will complete this journey just as she started it in Boston back on Sunday August 18, leaking transmission fluid not withstanding. Another 300 miles and an extra can of ATF in the tool bag should do the trick. My son Jim will be riding shotgun with me this time, while U.S. Route 6 "Masscot Wellfleet" will be chauffeured by his creators, Don and Nancy. I can hardly wait to join with the hundreds of other auto enthusiasts that will be sharing this upcoming CRUIZE weekend on the Historic Massachusetts U.S. Route 6. Rain or shine, a good time is planned at the host CRUIZE HQ Harbor Hotel on Cape Cod Bay and Route 6 in Provincetown.     

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http://www.route6tour.com/
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<![CDATA[Day 30: Tuesday September 17, 2013]]>Wed, 18 Sep 2013 20:37:51 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/day-30-tuesday-september-17-2013
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The 1972 Blue Colony Diner in Newtown, CT was my breakfast stop before attempting to CRUIZE the historic Route 6 alignment through Sandy Hook, the picturesque town where the tragic elimentary school shootings took place last year.

Bethel, CT to Providence, RI

I am a bit behind schedule posting yesterday's drive because I landing at my home in Attleboro, MA which is 9 1/2 miles from the end of my Providence, RI Historic Route 6 drive at Richmond Square where the former Red Bridge crossed the Seekonk River into East Providence. Today's U.S. Route 6 follows the I-195 interchange in Providence over the Washington Bridge a half mile south. Unpacking my truck and attending our car club meeting last night along with dinner at Tom's Tavern afterwards with members had me way behind my established road schedule habits. There will also be a 2 1/2 week gap in time before picking up the remainder of my U.S. Route 6 CRUIZE to Provincetown and mile zero on Oct. 5. 
The homestretch leg from Bethel, CT had me having an early breakfast at the 1972 Stainless Steel Blue Colony Diner at the intersection where U.S. Route 6 follows a modern bypass around the picturesque, but unfortunately the tragedy struck town of Sandy Hook. Because the historic Route 6 alignment is not yet marked I got turned around  leaving the town center and finally made it back on track. The road now becomes the "Antiques Trail" through Woodbury. It seems most of the beautiful 18th and 19th Century homes and barns have been transformed into antique boutiques, some 45 of them, for the one mile long drive down Main Street, interspaced with striking New England style churches and buildings. No stopping here as it could take about a week to browse through all that Wodbury has to offer. 
Continuing on through the rolling hills, with some grades as much as 9%, I finally come into the Bristol area where I see evidence of New England's infamouse triple deckers and road repair crews with uniformed police details and vehicles with their emergency lights ablaze. The rest of the U.S.A. seems to get along just fine without police details at road or bridge construction sites, while New England road maintenance thrives on them. A few of the small towns like Andover (1st Congregational Church and Nathaniel Hale birthplace marker) North Windahm (Aero Diner), Brooklyn (1812 Unitarian Church & Town Hall) provided some picture great taking opportunties. 
Then it was suddenly into Rhode Island at North Scituate. I also bypassed today's Route 6, preferring the old concrete washboard drive into the center on what is called the Danielson Pike where the Village Bean Cafe & Deli is located at the East Road intersection for another picture, regretting that I had eaten an early hearty breakfast. 
My challenge now was to try and follow the historical U.S. Roue 6 alignment through Providence's center which has undergone tremendous reconstruction and renewal in the city's center over the past 20 years. Surprisingly there were a few U.S. Route 6A signs that got me into the city's west end onto Hartford Ave. (New England road names in earlier times reflected where the road was going to or coming from) in Olneyville then onto Dorrance St. which crosses I-95. From that point you could easily see the straight route into the heart of downtown Providence onto Exchange Place past City Hall and the former Industrial National Bank, a.k.a. Superman Building of 1952-George Reeves T.V. fame, to Waterman St. and College Hill between the historic 1775 First Baptist Church and 1764 Brown University through to the end at what is now called Richmond Square, and where the Old Red Bridge footings can still be seen today. in my own young adult driving days this was a familiar back door crossing point over the Seekonk River into Providence's coffee house and R & B club scene of the late 1950's and early 1960's.
Over and out until October 5, or until I provide links for the albums containing the other 500 - 1000 photos I have yet to archive for my own reference and anyone else who may be interested in taking a more in-depth CRUIZN tour.       
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This view is from the historic U.S. Route 6 in Providence, RI crossing I-95 toward the 1950's era "Superman Building" in the center of Gotham City, home of the "Daily Planet" where Clark Kent and Lois Lane worked. The telephone booths where Clark Kent removed his street clothes are long gone, but the Industrail Trust National Bank building still stands.
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Historic U.S. Route 6 ends today in Richmond Sqaure where a five story office building was constructed upon the old Red Bridge's foundation in 1988. The former 1871 Gate House, to the immediate left and partially hidden from view, is now the Waterman Grille.
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The old Red Bridge foundations wich sit alongside the Seekonk River are shown in this photo. The bridge was torn down in 1978 and Route 6 was re-routed over the Washington Street Bridge following I-195 route out of Providence into Seekonk Massachusetts.
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<![CDATA[Day 29: Mansfield, PA to Bethel, CT]]>Tue, 17 Sep 2013 01:39:07 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/day-29-mansfield-pa-to-bethel-ct
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Lock 31 of the Delaware & Hudson Canal was built behind the 1821 "New Castle" house in 1827 and sits on U.S. Route 6 in Hawley, PA. This new park was just opened to the public on August 25, 2013 and the buildings still undergoing restoration.
The Pennsylvania U.S. Route 6 gets more interesting the further east I travel with surprises in almost every town I drive through. I drive the Alternate or Truck route 6 which brings you through the original historic U.S. Route 6 alignments instead of the super highway like bypasses that speed you past the most interesting turn of the century architecture in the town centers and their beautifully restored Victorian era homes. There were two scenic overlooks I stopped at today worth mentioning, the first is the "Marie Antoinette" overlook in Asylum, PA. I didn't know that Marie Antoinette ever made it to the U.S.A. and she really didn't, but a group of her supporters did and planned to build an asylum, hence the town's name, for her and her son on land they purchased in the valley below. There were 50 or so building built before she lost her head in Paris. The view is magnificent despite no evidence of the original exiled colonists remain.
The second is Bear Mountain Bridge Road scenic overlook above the Hudson River. There was no place for me to stop and take a picture of the Bear Mountain suspension bridge that crosses the Hudson River as I was able to do when Route 6 crossed the Delaware River. And the winding 3 mile two lane road exiting the toll bridge that Route 6 follows was cut into the steep Manitou Hills, following the rugged slopes of Anthony's Nose. It is an exhilarating drive similar to my Rocky and Sierra Mountain adventures. The overlook is about a mile away from and out of view of the suspension bridge, but the view of the Hudson river below and Dunderberg Mountain on the opposite shore is worth stopping for. The original toll house is another mile and a half further along the road. In the 1920's you had to pay the toll whether or not you used the bridge to cross the Hudson.
Oh yes, then there was the Model A used car lot in Milford, PA. See the pictures below.
I finally made it over the state line into homey New England and put up in Bethel, CT. Tomorrow is the home stretch over mostly familiar U.S. Route 6 once I get past Hartford.
      
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I stopped at the Helms Body Shop & Service Station on U.S. Route 6 in Milford, PA to look at his used Model A inventory peeking out of the garage. The 1929 Woody on the left is $7,500 and it runs and the wood looked in solid condition. After getting a copy of his inventory list of "For Sale" vehicles and business card I was leaving and I could hear the unmistakable ahooga horn sounds of a line of touring Model A's going by.
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Was that Jack Lane's old 1928 Woody driving by in the tour procession? The green plate on the front is the right color for a Mass 1928 plate.
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<![CDATA[Day 28: Sunday September 15, 2013]]>Mon, 16 Sep 2013 00:50:43 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/day-28-sunday-september-15-2013Lakewood (Cleveland, OH) to Mansfield, PA 
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The Geauga Country Courthouse in Chardon, Ohio was built in 1869 and it's red brick and light sandstone quoins make an impressive town square centerpiece with the beautifully landscaped park like setting.
The good thing about leaving early Sunday morning when attempting to drive U.S. Route 6 through Cleveland, East Cleveland and Euclid on it's famous Euclid Avenue was there is no traffic although there are hundreds of traffic lights and their timed sequencing to deal with. After trying a few different speeds, somewhere between 45 & 50 mph seemed to work best, well above the 30-35 mph speed limit. Fortunately there is not a lot of police presence on this avenue before church services start. It only took about 40 minutes to get through the traffic light gauntlet when I would expect normal traffic flow would take at least 1 1/2 hours; phew! 
When Route 6 swings east through Willoughby Hills you start to get the feeling of forests and winding hilly roads, a welcomed change driving. Farms still occupy the landscape in Ohio but they are the typical smaller farms we are familiar with instead of the horizon filled farms of the mid-west.
Many of the towns have a center common roundabout traffic flow that slows traffic from intersecting roads with many of the large townships having impressive turn of the century architecture, including the county courthouses, which are as unique as the counties they represent. Also, abandoned farm fields are filled with Goldenrod coming into full flower, beautiful, but not a good thing if you are an allergy sufferer. At the higher elevations in the Alleghany mountains the trees are starting to show color as is the sumac with it brilliant red leaves. This was another great day driving through the Alleghany mountains and valleys of Ohio and Pennsylvania and I've tried to select three pictures that illustrate the a bit of the hidden treasures that I found along U.S. Route 6 today. 
 
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The Cambridge Springs, PA historic Riverside Inn, built in 1885, is only open from April to December. They conduct "A Night in the Theater" dinner happenings during Sept. and Oct.
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Fallow farm fields are blooming with Goldenrod offering picturesque photo opportunities and visual colorful landscape displays in September before the fall foliage of early October.
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This obviously newly hewed giant chainsaw sculpture was sitting in the parking lot of Animalistic Art in Elgin, PA along with many other examples of this artists handiwork.
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<![CDATA[Day 27: Saturday September 14, 2013]]>Sun, 15 Sep 2013 03:13:36 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/day-27-saturday-september-14-2013Hammond, Indiana to Lakeland (Cleveland) Ohio
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A family and some potential bidders wait patiently for the Kankakee Valley Auctioneer to come to their space and begin hawking bids for their stuff.
I got on the road early this morning to make the 330 miles to Cleveland from Hammond Indiana. I am trying to get back home ahead of schedule for this coming Wednesday without jeopardizing my sightseeing. So far so good. While the ride into the bright sun early in the morning is a "bear", Wellfleet and I have to buck up. Imagine that, 27 days solo and I'm talking about a stuffed bear as if we're a team; shades of Tom Hanks in Cast Away. Well, it was getting to be a boring ride through a seemingly endless landscape of corn fields until we came to Walkerton, Ohio where the Kankakee Valley Auction was taking place alongside Route 6. I pulled into the auction site parking lot and grabbed my camera to se what was going on. Most everything there was old used and abused farm machinery, construction equipment, tools and a smattering of trucks all set up and displayed in a flea market arrangement so everyone could look at was to be auctioned off. There were three pickup trucks set up with auctioneer's booth (like a camper) in the truck's bed and each of the trucks would move from one seller's space to another and start the bidding process. The bidders would follow the trucks and when all the stuff in the space was sold they'd move on to the next space. When I got there three auctioneers hawking bids at the same time and it was confusing as all get out. The proper dress for attending these auctions are bib-overalls and a plaid shirt; red handkerchief hanging out the back pocket is optional.     
Next interesting stop was the town of Napoleon, Ohio with their imposing Henry County Court House which dominated the town's skyline from miles away. 
Route 6 then becomes the Great Lakes Ohio Coastal Trail following the Lake Erie coastline up to Cleveland. My camera was not auto focusing properly so I had to now use my back -up point-and-shoot camera which I wasn't doing very well with. I ruined some great photo opportunities in Nappanee with the Amish horse and buggies. By the way you can tell you're in Amish country when you see horse droppings in the break down lane.
Right off U.S. Route 6 in Sandusky, Ohio is the entrance causeway to Cedar Point billed as the Best Amusement Park in the World and definitely the Roller Coaster Capital of the World with 16 of them to scare the snot out of you. I drove in and, because it is on a peninsular surrounded by blue sky and open water, they didn't seem all that intimidating from a distance. Maybe I'll try them some other time. I love roller coasters, but I haven't been on one in over 40 years.   
Newport, R.I. may have imposing 19th century cottages on Ocean Drive, but there was no lack of multi million dollar mansions along Lake Drive on Lake Erie, miles of them. And the parks are absolutely beautiful. One that I stopped at, Lakeview Park in Lorain, had five different wedding parties there with photographers documenting their blessed events. I stopped to take a picture of the Lorain West Breakwater Lighthouse which I spotted driving past the park.  I met a local couple there who offered to take a picture of me and "Wellfleet" with the Lorain lighthouse in the background using their camera and will email it to me. In the meantime I have to live with few good pictures I took. 
I did make it to Lakewood which borders Cleveland some 324 miles from this morning's start.
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The imposing Henry County Courthouse dominates the Napoleon Ohio city skyline from quite a long distance on U.S. Route 6.
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The Lorain Lighthouse was built in 1917 on the Lake Erie west breakwater and is rightly called the "Jewel of the Port" (photo by Jann Dyke who also took a photo of me and Wellfleet with the Jewel in the background.)
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<![CDATA[Day 26: Friday September 13, 2013]]>Sat, 14 Sep 2013 03:15:03 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/day-26-friday-september-13-2013Davenport Iowa to Hammond, Indiana
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It ain't the Mississippi but, the Hennepin Canal lift bridge and lock is something you can take your time enjoying. The Hennepin canal connected barge traffic between the Mississippi and Rock River until 1951 when it was closed. It is now maintained as unique park system for camping, picnicking and fishing.
When I did finally get my butt in gear this morning I tried to get close to the Mississippi River before crossing over to Moline Illinois but quickly discovered the Davenport river front is still a working river lined rail and businesses Crossing over the river on the I-84/Rte. 6  bridge only told me when I was in Illinois or Iowa but not that I was crossing over the Mississippi.  Of course a strong morning sun was in my eyes heading east and I could have easily missed it.
The U.S. Route 6 landscape in Illinois continues to be agricultural and korn is still king. And unlike the Iowa landscape which had beautiful rolling hill vistas, most of the western Illinois farmland is flat.
My first stop was in Genesea to snap a picture of their RR station and iconic 100 year old  Farmers Bank building which had three retirees sitting on the bench outside. We swapped a few yarns and I moved on.
I kept seeing signs every now and then with directions to Hennepin lock #,s. Finally, when I got to lock #21, I pulled into the dirt road and found a very nice camping and picnic area with toilet facilities at a bend in what looked like a small river passing under Route 6. I continued along the road until I came to another larger picnic area with a concrete camping pad and another rest room. Going further a sign warned that trailers were not allowed this direction and I finally came up to canal lock #21. I drove onto the unique lift bridge to cross over the canal lock and took the picture above. This lock's lift bridge is visible from U.S. Route 6 in the town of Wyanet which l also had to stop in and take a picture of this new antique shop's bench and talk with the owner who told me he's fished the Hennepin canal system and has pulled lunkers weighing as much as 50 pounds out of there.
Some random thoughts and things noticed driving through Illinois: people still burn their trash in 55 gallon drums in small town back yards, Route 6 is called the "Illinois River Road", regular unleaded (no 10% ethanol) is always available at the pump but costs 50 cents a gallon more than ethanol added regular - both are 87 octane, Rte. 6 intersects Route 66 in Joliet next to the Will County Correctional facilities, so officially I have driven on Route 66, but not the most nostalgic part.
Route 6 passes south of Chicago, parallel with I-80, so I continued over the state line into Hammond Indiana before settling in for the night.  
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Yep, that wood bench under the awning of the hundred year old Farmers Bank building in Genesea Illinois is the perfect settin' spot on a fall morning to swap yarns as I did for a few minutes with these three old timers.
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Passing through the center of Wyanet Illinois on Route 6, this new antique shop had just opened two months ago and Wellfleet couldn't resist trying out their neat looking settin' bench out front.
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<![CDATA[Day 25: Thursday September 12, 2013]]>Fri, 13 Sep 2013 05:40:08 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/day-25-thursday-september-12-2013Council Bluffs, Iowa to Davenport, Iowa
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Thelma Nopoulas scooped a nice cone of fresh strawberry ice cream for Wellfleet that hubby George still makes fresh daily at age 93.
I traveled much of the Historic U.S. Route 6 alignment today, from Council Bluffs to Davenport that also includied the remaining 50 mile section of the historic White Pole Road from Adair to Dexter. I missed a section of Historic Route 6 from Atalissa to U.S 61 in Davenport due to a bridge construction project detour that was later corrected when I met Dave Darby, Executive Director of the Iowa U.S. Tourist Association, at my hotel. My post is primarily about a couple of special people that Dave introduced to me in the town of Wilton, George and Thelma Nopoulas, proprietors of the oldest ongoing ice cream parlor in the WORLD, the Wilton Candy Kitchen,. George has also got to be the oldest working soda jerk at age 93, having been doing it for 87 years. 
Dave and I got to the Wilton ice cream parlor well after they closed at 5 pm because we stopped at several other spots I had missed earlier to take some photos before dark. As we were taking photos of the store front and I had set up some shots with Wellfleet, our U.S. Route 6 Massachusetts mascot bear, the door opened and Thelma stuck her head out and asked if we wanted to come inside. Well, never to miss an opportunity to meet U.S. Route 6 living legends, we quickly responded YES. George was also inside and greeted us. Thelma gave me the complete verbal history of their store and how George still makes the 2 1/2 gallon batches of ice cream fresh each day. She then offered to make a cone of fresh strawberry ice cream for Wellfleet so I could take a picture inside the store. Because Wellfleet doesn't talk yet, I can verify the strawberry was absolutely delicious. As we were ready to leave, Thelma offered to turn on the neon signs so we could take pictures while the sun was setting. I have to say, this was one of the best experiences on the four weeks of CRUIZN the U.S.A. and, making even a short segment of this historic Route 6 with Dave, was both informative and enjoyable, particularly after driving over 7,000 miles without talking to someone riding shotgun. Dave has also been single handedly getting Historic Iowa Route 6 signs posted to help touring road adventurers like myself find their way along all the historic alignments that, over the years, have been replaced with county road designations or comingled with newer Interstate super highways or have been bypassed totally. If only we could paint all the poles white again, harkening back to a time in the early 1900's when the towns had the responsibility of guiding travelers through their communities. Although our long distance drives would take a bit longer they would be more interesting instead boring as they are on today's newer roads.
 I also have to mention that when I stopped inside the iconic Mobilgas Candyland Station in Grinnell, there was a coincidental crossing of paths with another couple traveling west on the Historic U.S. Route 6 from Pennsylvania while I was heading East.     
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That's me posing with our Massachusetts U.S. Route 6 mascot bear "Wellfleet" in front of the 1860 Wilton (Iowa) Candy Kitchen.
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Thelma turned on the store's neon lights for Dave Darby and I to take pictures at sunset. The store normally close at 5 pm now so, seeing the store lighted was a special treat.
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<![CDATA[ Day 24: Wednesday September 11, 2013                  We will never forget!]]>Wed, 11 Sep 2013 04:34:54 GMThttp://cruizn.us/daily-posts-2013/day-24-wednesday-september-11-2013-we-will-never-forget
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That's Wellfleet sitting on the curb waiting to get in to see Harold Warp's (Flex--O-Glass Inventor) Pioneer Village museum in Minder, NE on U.S. Route 6

McCook Nebraska to Omaha, NE/Council Bluffs, IA

Having driven through Nebraska from East to West on Route 20 from South Sioux City to Wyoming, I was expecting the Southern West to East drive, from Denver to Omaha, to be pretty much the same but I was wrong. The U.S Route 6 corridor appears to an economic engine with the rail lines humming with freight  trains hauling coal, grain (corn), ethanol and cattle. Every town had grain elevator towers with rail and truck terminals. The fields of corn have a large ethanol fuel processing facility in Hastings with a coal fired power plant across the road (Route 6).  There were feed lots and ranches filled with black angus cattle, and of course endless miles of corn being harvested or waiting for harvest. Additionally, there was a Remington munitions plant near what are the Naval munitions storage bunkers that stretch for miles along Route 6 with corn fields planted between the Naval bunker property and highway.
Yet, plunked in down in the middle of the state is the town of Minden, Nebraska with one of the most amazing and interesting museum collections I've ever seen. There are 28 buildings on 20 acres with more than 50,000 items that describe how America Grew. It's difficult to describe in a few sentences. Everything from the oldest steam powered Merry-Go-Round in America to some 300 cars dating from the late 1800's arranged by Marque and their order of development, to buildings from a sod plains to a fire house and home room interiors, kitchens, living rooms & bedrooms from the 1870 era to today. All the trees grown in our northern climate are planted around the property have their names tagged. Also, all exhibits have complete descriptions of their history and sales price or invoices. Harold Warp, inventor of Plexiglass, amassed this collection when he traveled the country to see his salespeople. He asked them to notify him when there were interesting auctions or foreclosure sales that had Americana items he could collect. He was born in Minden which is why this amazing museum collection is located in the middle of Nebraska instead of Denver or Omaha. I could have spent two full days looking at some of the most interesting exhibits. I did take over 70 photos of some of those, like the 1909 Brush, the creator of which also helped design the 1 cylinder Cadillac engine and the 1911 Little which Louis Chevrolet built and that William Durant used to incorporate the Chevrolet Motor Car Company, and the first production snowmobile built with a 1930 Model A. It appears none of the items have been restored, but are maintained in their original finish and condition, blemishes and all.
 Another busy and interesting day of travel and exploration on Route 6. Oh yes, I had to have a prime rib dinner at the famous Johnny's Café in the Omaha stockyards (family owned since 1922), a fitting end to a long day of travel.
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This grain elevator in Axtell, NE is one of many alongside U. S. Route 6 that was loading 18 wheeler grain haulers. There is also a rail spur for loading R.R. grain cars.
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This Chief Ethanol Fuel Plant in Hastings has it all with corn fields in the middle, blue ethanol storage tanks on the right and R.R. tank cars behind the storage tanks being loaded for rail transport while 18 wheeler tank trucks and grain trucks were pulling into the processing plant when I stopped. Across the street was a huge coal fired power plant and not a sign of air pollution from either facility.
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